As the shiny gloss of a new semester at college wears off and you enter the grind of homework and midterms and finals, it’s easy to get stuck. At Boston University, it’s called the “BU Bubble,” but I’m sure it has to exist at other colleges, too. You start to go to the same places and do the same things every day, and in the process, you forget to leave campus. This problem becomes even more severe as finals season bears down upon us, crushing us under the weight of our expensive textbooks.

The American electorate is fresh from the third presidential debate and weeks away from the most contentious election season in recent history. In this time of political chaos, though, it’s important to recognize two things. One, that this presidential contest is not the first contentious one. Two, that this isn’t the first time the United States has seen protest and civil unrest.

Unlike other museums, the interactive elements at the The Center for Civil and Human Rights (NCCHR) in Atlanta, Georgia, are never cheesy or distracting – they are built into the experience.

I had never been to LA before, but one thing I learned about the city right away is that getting anywhere is unbelievably difficult and expensive. After LA, I will never complain about Boston’s five cent subway fare hike ever again. Luckily, there was lots to do in and around campus. If you’re as stingy with your Ubers as I am, check out my comprehensive college tour of the Loyola Marymount University.

Three out of four of my grandparents were immigrants. Two generations later, I grew up comfortably, as middle-class American as we could be, far removed from the countries my grandparents left behind. I don’t straddle the cultural gap that first-generation American kids do. And to try to understand it better, I interviewed three of my friends, all first-generation Americans, who know that gap well.

Malaysia, located in southeast Asia, is split into two parts, separated by a stretch of ocean. The western part shares a border with Thailand, while the eastern part sits on the island of Borneo, which it shares with Indonesia and Brunei. The capital, Kuala Lumpur, is located in the western part. There is so much in Malaysia to explore, from east to west, city to jungle. Until I can go, I can only dream about the reasons I want to.

The Commonwealth Shakespeare Company, or CSC, started what would become Shakespeare on the Common in 1996, with a midsummer performance of – you guessed it – A Midsummer Night’s Dream. That performance took place in Copley Square, but the next year’s Romeo and Juliet migrated to the Parkman Bandstand in Boston Common, where the program would thrive for the next two decades. This summer, for its 21st season, the CSC has mounted a hilarious production of Love’s Labour’s Lost.